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Articles tagged with: smoking

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[10 Apr 2011 | No Comment | ]

DESPITE the mountains of information warning us of the dangers of smoking, young Australians are lighting up in droves.
They’re not old enough to legally buy a pack of cigarettes but almost 60,000 Australian children aged 15-17 are regular smokers.
Although smoking rates have declined over recent decades, young people were the most likely to have increased the amount they smoked in the past year, a new report by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has found.
Five per cent of children aged 12-15 smoke according to another study, the Australian Secondary Schools …

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[6 Mar 2011 | No Comment | ]

A new study has found that electronic cigarettes are a promising tool to help smokers quit, producing six-month abstinence rates nearly double those for traditional nicotine replacement products.
The study, led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers, found that 31 per cent of respondents reported having quit smoking six months after first purchasing an electronic cigarette, a battery-powered device providing tobacco-less doses of nicotine in a vaporized solution.
The average six-month abstinence rate for traditional nicotine replacement products, such as nicotine patches or gum, is between 12 and 18 …

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[15 Feb 2011 | No Comment | ]

Researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered that putting tobacco out of sight in shops can change the attitude of young people to smoking, while not hitting retailers in the pocket.
Academics from the University’s UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies looked at the effect of the removal of tobacco displays in the Republic of Ireland, ahead of similar legislation which is due to come into force in the UK.
In one study the research team found that the number of teenagers who recalled tobacco displays dropped from 81 per cent …

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[7 Feb 2011 | No Comment | ]

Heavy smoking in middle age is linked to more than double the risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia two decades later, according to a new study.
Current estimates suggest smoking is responsible for several million deaths per year from causes such as heart disease and cancer, according to background information in the article.
Minna Rusanen, M.D., of University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland, and colleagues analyzed data from 21,123 members of one health care system who participated in a survey between 1978 and 1985, when …

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[31 Jan 2011 | No Comment | ]

SCIENTISTS have pinpointed a source of nicotine craving in the brain, opening up a new path towards drug treatments to help smokers kick their habit, according to a study released on Sunday.
Tobacco kills more than five million people every year and accounts for nearly one-in-10 adult deaths, 90 per cent of them due to lung cancer. In experiments with mice and rats, the researchers mapped the functioning of a gene called CHRNA5 that has been previously fingered in nicotine addiction.
The gene controls a receptor – an entry point on the …

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[31 Jan 2011 | No Comment | ]

The U.S. spends more on health care than any other nation yet has worse life expectancy than many—and a new report blames smoking and obesity.
That may sound surprising, considering that public smoking is being stamped out here while it is common in parts of Europe. And obesity is a growing problem around the world.
But the U.S. led those unhealthy trends, lighting up and fattening up a few decades ahead of other high-income countries. And the long-term consequences are life expectancy a few years shorter than parts of Europe and Japan, …

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[27 Jan 2011 | No Comment | ]

HIGH smoking rates in the past, combined with widespread obesity, continue to chip away at US life expectancy compared to other wealthy nations, a study released on Tuesday said.
Over the past 25 years, life expectancy after 50 has risen in the United States, but at a slower rate than in countries like Japan and Australia, said the National Academy of Sciences report.
The gap sounded the alarm among government researchers because the United States spends more on health care than any other country, said the study which examined mortality records in …